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5 Books like Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: Matchless Rush

Kedar Prasana itcher‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’ is a powerful book. In all probability, it will leave you wondering if you are truly ‘living’ at all. ‘Post Office’, ‘The Rum Diary’, ‘Naked Lunch’, ‘Money’ and ‘Trainspotting’ are a few books similar to ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’ that can help you take your ‘cool quotient’ a notch higher. ~ Kedar Prasana

Buy the Damn Tickets, Take the Damn Ride!

It’s not simple. Life is not simple. But, Hunter S. Thompson thought differently. If there was ever a team of guys who lived on their own terms, he would walk right into it – no questions asked!

A piqued fruit of the beat generation, Hunter S. Thompson had no regard for authority of any kind. In fact, he detested laws. He chose to break them willingly, as far as whatever vestiges of conscience he harboured allowed him through his ‘Gonzo Journalism’.

He was a man of wild manners and wilder gratifications, something that’s forever etched into pop culture through ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’.

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Books Similar to ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’…

‘Post Office’ (Charles Bukowski, 1971)

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Any damn fool can beg up some kind of job; it takes a wise man to make it without working.

Charles Bukowski was already past his prime when he published his first novel ‘Post Office’. On many levels, this is a book like ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’.

It’s raw; it’s crass at times; it doesn’t mind using expletives with an alarmingly high frequency; it’s high on alcohol, debauchery and hedonism – in short, it’s ‘alive’.

Similarity Match: 90%
While not half as rich with cringe‐worthy anecdotes, ‘Post Office’ certainly works its way as a small‐town and toned‐down version of ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’.

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‘The Rum Diary’ (Hunter S. Thompson, 1998)

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Old God sure was in a good mood when he made this place.

This early masterpiece from Hunter S. Thompson didn’t see the light of the day for three decades. When finally published, it had to cop a lot of criticism for its ostensibly decadent writing.

That wouldn’t deter someone like Thompson, though. He pushed the publication all along. The plot involves a story of corrupted love tangles and rum‐imbibed carousels in the Caribbean.

It was later made into a moderately successful film by Johnny Depp who himself was friends with the author

Similarity Match: 85%
‘The Rum Diary’ takes a more intimate look at Hunter S. Thompson’s personal life than ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’ manages. Both of them, however, always follow the pedal to the floor protocol.

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‘Naked Lunch’ (William S. Burroughs, 1959)

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O death where is thy sting? The man is never on time!

‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’ explores the world of carnal pleasures of all sorts, whereas ‘Naked Lunch’ delves deep into the indulgences of cerebral kind.

William S. Burroughs was an important contributor to the beat generation literature. ‘Naked Lunch’ follows a very unreliable narrator whose existence is never redoubtable. As his mind wanders the planet, readers are taken on a trip that’s bound to cause mental disturbances.

What’s more, the innovative ‘cut up’ technique used by Burroughs means you are never sure about the plot, either!

Similarity Match: 80%
‘Naked Lunch’ is a series of vignettes that seem to have nothing in common, just like unending ramblings that dot the pages of ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’. The effect that these produce is, however, pretty impressive.

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If You Like ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’, You Will Like…

These were all essentially American selections. It will be foolish to assume that there’s no place for debauchery across the Atlantic!

‘Money’ (Martin Amis, 1986)

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I still feel the old exclusion. Where would I be in Animal Farm? One of the rats, I thought at first.

Much like his father Kingsley Amis, Martin Amis has a gift for serious humour. This was first made apparent when ‘Money’ was published.

There are many similarities between ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’ and ‘Money’. Both are big on intoxication of every kind and neither seems to detest it. ‘Money’ follows a young executive who has money to spend and the only question he faces is what to spend it on.

Extreme crudeness, a purely physical outlook of the world and indulgence of the unimaginable order are what make ‘Money’ a book like ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’.

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‘Trainspotting’ (Irvine Welsh, 1993)

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But ah cannae even endorse these sentiments as they are at best peripheral
tae the moment.

‘Trainspotting’ has, since its publication, become a cult yardstick. Written in a style that takes every bit of care to get the reader as confused as the heroin‐smacking punks that it hosts, the book is an experience in its own right.

Many consider it to be a Scottish counterpart of ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’. It was further popularized by the eponymous movie directed by Danny Boyle.

‘Fear and Loathing in Last Vegas’ couldn’t be more American. ‘Trainspotting’, in the same vein, stays true to the local flavour, making sure
to include all the nuances of Scottish back‐alley life.

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No Hour Is a Bad Hour to Read!

Many claim to live their lives to the fullest. But you can’t really get as close to this notion as the protagonists of books listed above. In this ‘better to burn out than fade away’ spirit, you can check out some more books similar to ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’: ‘Dharma Bums’, ‘Ham on Rye’, ‘Dirt’ and ‘The Doors of Perception’.

If you have suggestions of your own to make, do let us know in the comment box below!

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